Dr. Amy Wolff

portrait photo of Amy Wolff with books behind

Dr. Amy Wolff

Postdoctoral Neuroscientist

Amy obtained her undergraduate B.A. (hons) degree in Psychology from the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, after which she continued her studies there under the supervision of Professor David Bilkey, graduating with a Ph.D. in Neuroscience in 2011. Amy’s doctoral thesis examined the long-term behavioural and neural consequences of alterations in the maternal environment, and the relationship of these changes to a schizophrenic phenotype. In 2012, she moved to Hamburg, Germany, for postdoctoral research with Professor Hanganu-Opatz at the Center for Molecular Neurobiology, where she explored how the communication between brain regions develops during early postnatal life. Amy then moved to the UK to take up a Roche Postdoctoral Fellowship, working with Professor Dimitri Kullmann (University College London), Professor David Bannerman (University of Oxford), and Dr Dennis Kaetzel (UCL/Oxford). As part of her work, Amy utilized chemogenetic and optogenetic techniques to explore how the dysfunction of different types of neurons might be involved in schizophrenia.

Amy joined the MRC Unit in January 2016 and works with Dr Paul Dodson and Professor Peter Magill on a project investigating the in vivo firing properties of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.